HOME SCHOOLING: WHAT'S HARD? WHAT HELPS?

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The purpose of this research was to identify what home schooling parents find most difficult about teaching their children at home, what sources of support are available to them, and which of these they find most helpful..

Richard G. Medlin, Volume 11, No. 4, p. 1-6

Errata

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This Errata was included in HSR 12-1

HOME SCHOOLING: AN EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENT FOR PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION

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Programmed instruction was thought to be dead—and home schooling a novelty with a short life expectancy. The call for educational reform, however, has made these concepts more than a jumble of unrelated ideas..

Robert W. Butler, Volume 11, No. 4, 1995, p. 7-16

THE IMPACT OF HOMESCHOOLING ON MATH EDUCATION

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The purpose of this present study was to analyze the factors related to the development of math skills in a homeschool environment and to help parents be more effective..

Jack A. Sande, Vol. 11, No. 3, 1995, p. 7-15

HOME SCHOOLERS, SELF-ESTEEM, AND SOCIALIZATION

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"What about socialization?"  The first question many parents encounter when they announce they will home educate their children is not about legality or certification but about socialization. The issue of socialization and, related to it, the development of self-esteem in home schooled children is perhaps the greatest concern of educators, courts, and laypeople alike..

Vicki D. Tillman, Vol. 11, No. 3, 1995, p. 1-6

MUSIC IN HOME EDUCATION: A CREATIVE APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING MUSIC

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Music education in home schools is an area of curriculum that is somewhat vague and presumably less requisite than other disciplines of study..

Paul Fehrenbach, Vol. 11, No. 2, 1995, p. 11- mis??

AN ANALYSIS OF HOME EDUCATION RESEARCH AND RESEARCHERS

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The research reported in this article was designed to update current knowledge about home education and related policy matters by examining a specific area that is infrequently a target of inquiry--the content and direction of research on home education..

Gregory J. Cizek, Ph.D. and Brian D. Ray, Ph.D., Vol. 11, No. 2, 1995, p. 1-9

HOME SCHOOLED AND CONVENTIONALLY SCHOOLED HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES: A COMPARISON OF APTITUDE FOR AND...

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Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine differences in academic preparedness as well as academic achievement among college students who had attended home schools, public schools, and conventional Christian schools.
Rhonda A. Scott Galloway, Ed.D. and Joe P. Sutton, Ph.D., Vol. 11, No. 1, 1995, p. 1-9