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Attachment Theory and Home-Based Education

Brian D. Ray National Home Education Research Institute, Salem,…

Homeschool Technology and Online Communication

Lina Valery Lake Worth, Florida, USA, becreative@me.com    Abstract Online…

Common Features of Modern Mass Schooling, and Homeschooling

Brian D. Ray National Home Education Research Institute, Salem,…

On Blacks Choosing Home-Based Education

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Many Americans today – whether plumbers, professors, painters, or politicians – believe that children and youth should attend public schools so they can have proper individual lives and be part of the best social life that advances the best corporate societal life. This sentiment is consistent with major changes that occurred regarding education during the mid- to late-nineteenth century.

Social Skills and Satisfaction with Social Relationships

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Social Skills and Satisfaction with Social Relationships in Home-Schooled, Private-Schooled, and Public-Schooled Children

Abstract: Despite the fact that 1.5 to 2.1 million children are home-schooled, there is limited research on the impact of home-schooling on children’s social skills.  This study compares 53 home-schooled, 49 private-schooled, and 48 public-schooled children between the ages of 8 and 12 on social skills, as measured by the Parent and Student Forms of the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS).  In addition, the groups’ satisfaction with social relationships were compared using the Peer Network and Dyadic Loneliness Scale (PNDLS), the Loneliness and Social Dissatisfaction Questionnaire (LSDQ), and the Friendship Qualities Scale (FQS).  There were significant differences between the home-schooled children and private-schooled children on the SSRS-Student Form and between home-schooled children and the public-schooled children on the FQS.

Marcia J. McKinley, Jesika N. Asaro, Jamie Bergin, Nicole D’Auria, and Katherine E. Gagnon, Volume 17, Number 3, p. 1-6

An Analysis of Homeschooled and Non-Homeschooled Students’ Performance on an ACT Mathematics Test

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The current study does not try to establish any comparison between public school students’ results on ACT and their homeschooled counterparts. Rather the goal was to take homeschooled students and compare their test results to the group of all other students. It is true that the second group results will be largely influenced by public school students’ results. But it is also true that the second group includes students who do not belong to public education (i.e., private schools). Simply put, the goal of this study was to compare homeschooled students to everybody else, with regard to their scores on an ACT mathematics achievement test.

Basil Qaqish, Ph.D., Volume 17, Number 2, p. 1-12

Homeschooled Children’s Social Skills

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The social skills scores of the homeschooled were consistently higher than those of public school students. “Differences were most marked for girls and for older children, and encompassed all four of the specific skills tested: cooperation, assertiveness, empathy, and self-control.” Gender differences were considered and found.

Richard G. Medlin, Ph.D., 2006, Volume 17, Number 1, p. 1-8

Parental Reasons By Grade Level

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Do Parental Reasons to Homeschool Vary By Grade? Evidence from the National Household Education Survey, 2001

In general, younger and older homeschooled students are educated at home for the same reasons: parents believe they can provide them a better education (47%) and for religious reasons (41%). However, there are some differences in reasons according to the grade levels of the students.

Guillermo Montes, Ph.D., Volume 16, Number 4, 2006, p. 11-17

Religious Outcomes in Conventionally Schooled and Home Schooled Youth

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Purposes to determine if outcomes of home educated students were commensurate with the religious objectives given by many as reason for choosing home-based education by comparing responses to the instrument entitled Daily Challenges Inventory. Significant difference between homeschooled and conventionally schooled youth was found on 14 items of the DCI. The homeschooled group was significantly less likely to watch MTV; use drugs; lie to a parent, teacher, or other older person; attempt suicide; drink enough alcohol to be legally drunk; or gamble. Homeschoolers were also significantly less likely to describe themselves as too busy, stressed out, angry with life, confused, or always tired. Conventionally schooled youth were significantly more likely to describe themselves as upbeat, encouraged, and seeking answers.

 

T. Wayne McEntire, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 2, 2005, p. 13-18

 

 

Home School Graduates and Their Mothers Talk About Literacy Instruction

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Interviews, face-to-face, high school graduates of homeschooling and their mothers about their literacy experiences to elicit in-depth literacy information in an informal non-threatening way, with the potential of pursuing desired information that might not be reported on a written questionnaire. Addresses many topics such as reading aloud, early memories, decoding, comprehension, favorite books, literature, vocabulary, grammar, spelling, writing, Christian materials, other instructional materials and techniques, Time Spent on Reading and Language Arts, family co-operatives, reading problems, current reading, what would you do differently?, and would you homeschool your own children?

June D. Knafle, Ph.D., and Alice Legenza Wescott, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 2, 2005, p. 1-12