You are here: HomeNews

The latest news and commentary on homeschooling research, and more, from NHERI and Dr. Brian Ray.

Homeschool SAT Scores for 2014 Higher Than National Average

Homeschool SAT Scores for 2014 Higher Than National Average

Brian D. Ray, Ph.D.

June 7, 2016

The SAT 2014 test scores of college-bound homeschool students were higher than the national average of all college-bound seniors that same year. Some 13,549 homeschool seniors had the following mean scores: 567 in critical reading, 521 in mathematics, and 535 in writing (College Board, 2014a). The mean SAT scores for all college-bound seniors in 2014 were 497 in critical reading, 513 in mathematics, and 487 in writing (College Board, 2014b). The homeschool students’ SAT scores were 0.61 standard deviation higher in reading, 0.26 standard deviation higher in mathematics, and 0.42 standard deviation higher in writing than those of all college-bound seniors taking the SAT, and these are notably large differences.

There were some demographic differences between homeschool students and all students taken together. First, the family incomes of the homeschool students were similar to those of all students. Regarding ethnicity, for example, 72 percent of the homeschool students were White, 5 percent were Asian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander, and 4 percent were Black or African American, while of all college-bound seniors, the corresponding percentages were 49, 12, and 13. The average highest level of parental education was notably higher for the homeschool students than for all students.

This point-in-time description of SAT scores simply shows that the test scores of homeschool students are higher than the national average for all students. No careful analysis has been done of these scores to determine whether certain background variables might statistically explain the differences in scores. These relatively high SAT scores of home-educated students are consistent with their high SAT scores in preceding research and with research findings on the overall success of college students who were home educated (Gloeckner & Jones, 2013; Murphy, 2012; Ray & Eagleson, 2008).

References

College Board. (2014a). SAT 2014 college-bound seniors state profile report, U.S. home school students. New York, NY: Author.

College Board. (2014b). SAT 2014 college-bound seniors total group profile report, total group. New York, NY: Author. Retrieved June 7, 2016 from https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/sat/TotalGroup-2014.pdf

Gloeckner, Gene W., & Jones, Paul. (2013). Reflections on a decade of changes in homeschooling and homeschooled into higher education. Peabody Journal of Education, 88(3), 309-323.

Murphy, Joseph. (2012). Homeschooling in America: Capturing and assessing the movement. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin, a Sage Company.

Ray, Brian D., & Eagleson, Bruce K. (2008, August 14). State regulation of homeschooling and homeschoolers’ SAT scores. Journal of Academic Leadership, 6(3). Retrieved March 4, 2013 from http://contentcat.fhsu.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15732coll4/id/303/rec/1

# # #

Results Now Public from Gen2 Survey Research Project

Results Now Public from Gen2 Survey Research Project

Article by Brian D. Ray, Ph.D., January 30, 2015

Read more: Results Now Public from Gen2 Survey Research Project

A Thorny Survey of Homeschool Graduates

A Thorny Survey of Homeschool Graduates: A Brief Review of A Complex Picture: Results of a 2014 Survey of Adult Alumni of the Modern Christian Homeschool Movement by Stollar

Article by Brian D. Ray, Ph.D., December 11, 2014

Read more: A Thorny Survey of Homeschool Graduates

A Brief Review of The Homeschool Effect by Rodger Williams

A Brief Review of The Homeschool Effect by Rodger Williams

Article by Brian D. Ray, Ph.D., July 11, 2014

Read more: A Brief Review of The Homeschool Effect by Rodger Williams

 

About NHERI

NHERI conducts homeschooling research, is a clearinghouse of research for the public, researchers, homeschoolers, the media, and policy makers, and educates the public concerning the findings of all related research. NHERI executes, evaluates, and disseminates studies and information (e.g., statistics, facts, data) on homeschooling (i.e., home schooling, home-based education, home education, home school, home-schooling, unschooling, deschooling, a form of alternative education), publishes reports and the peer-reviewed scholarly journal Home School Researcher, and serves in consulting, academic achievement tests, and expert witness (in courts and legislatures).

PO Box 13939
Salem, OR 97309
503-364-1490
503-364-3837 fax
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.