Homeschooled Students' Adjustment to College

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complete title:
Emotional, social and academic adjustment to college: A comparison between Christian home schooled and traditionally schooled college freshmen

Scott White, Elizabeth Williford, John Brower, Terance Collins, Roman Merry, and Maryam Washington; Home School Researcher, 2007, Volume 17, Number 4, p. 1-7.

Home schooled students’ ability to successfully adjust to college life is one important criterion to demonstrate a positive outcome of home schooling. The present study compared . . . on the College Adjustment Scale. The mean scores of the two groups were compared across the nine CAS scales designed to measure emotional, behavioral, social and academic problems typically presenting to university counseling centers. The home schooled students scored significantly . . .

Keywords, descriptors, key terms: college, college adjustment, adults, socialization, academics, home schooling, homeschooling, home education, home-based education

On Blacks Choosing Home-Based Education

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Many Americans today – whether plumbers, professors, painters, or politicians – believe that children and youth should attend public schools so they can have proper individual lives and be part of the best social life that advances the best corporate societal life. This sentiment is consistent with major changes that occurred regarding education during the mid- to late-nineteenth century.

Chinese Graduate Students’ Perspectives on Home Schooling

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Chinese Graduate Students’ Perspectives on Home Schooling

Although an established alternative form of American education, the concept of home schooling is just beginning to surface in China. Few Chinese have knowledge of home schooling yet alone consider this form of education. However, graduate students studying in the field of education are aware of this unusual alternative to traditional schooling, one that leads to many questions and discussion. Findings from interviews with twenty-four graduate students (former teachers in Chinese schools) present their understandings, concerns, and perspectives of home schooling. These include implications of a one-child policy, concerns about socialization, changing roles for Chinese women, cultural values, economic issues and lessons Chinese teachers could learn from home schooling. Findings provide a unique Chinese-Marxism perspective on home schooling and discussion addresses the potential of home schooling in the PRC.

Michael H. Romanowski, Volume 17, Number 3, p. 7-15

Social Skills and Satisfaction with Social Relationships

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Social Skills and Satisfaction with Social Relationships in Home-Schooled, Private-Schooled, and Public-Schooled Children

Abstract: Despite the fact that 1.5 to 2.1 million children are home-schooled, there is limited research on the impact of home-schooling on children’s social skills.  This study compares 53 home-schooled, 49 private-schooled, and 48 public-schooled children between the ages of 8 and 12 on social skills, as measured by the Parent and Student Forms of the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS).  In addition, the groups’ satisfaction with social relationships were compared using the Peer Network and Dyadic Loneliness Scale (PNDLS), the Loneliness and Social Dissatisfaction Questionnaire (LSDQ), and the Friendship Qualities Scale (FQS).  There were significant differences between the home-schooled children and private-schooled children on the SSRS-Student Form and between home-schooled children and the public-schooled children on the FQS.

Marcia J. McKinley, Jesika N. Asaro, Jamie Bergin, Nicole D’Auria, and Katherine E. Gagnon, Volume 17, Number 3, p. 1-6

An Analysis of Homeschooled and Non-Homeschooled Students’ Performance on an ACT Mathematics Test

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The current study does not try to establish any comparison between public school students’ results on ACT and their homeschooled counterparts. Rather the goal was to take homeschooled students and compare their test results to the group of all other students. It is true that the second group results will be largely influenced by public school students’ results. But it is also true that the second group includes students who do not belong to public education (i.e., private schools). Simply put, the goal of this study was to compare homeschooled students to everybody else, with regard to their scores on an ACT mathematics achievement test.

Basil Qaqish, Ph.D., Volume 17, Number 2, p. 1-12

An Analysis of the Economic Impact of Home and Private Schooling in Nevada

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ARE HOME AND private schools a “cost” to traditional public schools? This argument has often been used by local school districts, and others, to push for legislation that would restrict the establishment of these alternative schools. By focusing on home and private schools, and using Nevada as an example, this paper analyzes the impact of these alternative schools in depth. What is found is that aside from their superior effectiveness (Duvall, Delquadri, & Ward, 2004; National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2002; Rudner, 1999), the reduced public school enrollment caused by the presence of alternative schooling results in lower educational costs for the affected school district.

John T. Wenders, Ph.D. & Andrea D. Clements, Ph.D., Volume 17, No. 2, 2007, p. 13-35