Posts

Parental Reasons By Grade Level

/
Do Parental Reasons to Homeschool Vary By Grade? Evidence from the National Household Education Survey, 2001

In general, younger and older homeschooled students are educated at home for the same reasons: parents believe they can provide them a better education (47%) and for religious reasons (41%). However, there are some differences in reasons according to the grade levels of the students.

Guillermo Montes, Ph.D., Volume 16, Number 4, 2006, p. 11-17

Empathy, Altruism, and Moral Development

/
Empathy, Altruism, and Moral Development in Home Schooled Children

 

Homschooling parents were more concerned with teaching their children their values and religious beliefs, and more convinced that their children’s education reinforced this endeavor, than public school parents. They were also more confident that their children had embraced the values encompassed in their education. The two groups of parents did not differ, however, concerning whether they wanted their children to decide for themselves what values to believe in. Compared to public school parents, home schooling parents reported slightly more prosocial behavior in their children.  In general, the attitudes toward religion and values expressed by home schooling parents were positively related to children’s prosocial behavior.

 Skylar T.  Kingston and Richard G. Medlin, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 4, 2006, p. 1-10

The Liberal State Thesis

/

The Liberal State Thesis Regarding Parental Authority, Children’s Rights, and Homeschooling: How Far 

Critiques the “liberal state thesis” that, among other things, promotes “the continued development and encroachment of the liberal state upon parental authority to homeschool children without undue interference and regulation of the government.” Offers a more positive view of homeschooling, and defends the responsibility of parental authority in determining their children’s educational delivery system.

Stephen M. King, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 3, 2005, p. 15-24

 

Parental Duty and the Shape of the Future

/
Explains that the state-based approach to determining which values are passed on to succeeding generations resolves the difficulty of indiscriminate social reproduction (i.e., some values are reproduced and not others) but it is not self-evident that this is the right way to resolve the difficulty. Explores an alternative approach, “a dispersed model in which individuals and groups work independently to preserve what they most value in the society and to pass beliefs and moral commitments on to the next generation.” Argues that this approach “better fits the actual moral beliefs of parents and citizens; it is more likely to produce the outcomes parents want (or should want) for their own children and what adult citizens should want for all children.”

 

Charles Howell, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 3, 2005, p. 1-14

 

 

Religious Outcomes in Conventionally Schooled and Home Schooled Youth

/
Purposes to determine if outcomes of home educated students were commensurate with the religious objectives given by many as reason for choosing home-based education by comparing responses to the instrument entitled Daily Challenges Inventory. Significant difference between homeschooled and conventionally schooled youth was found on 14 items of the DCI. The homeschooled group was significantly less likely to watch MTV; use drugs; lie to a parent, teacher, or other older person; attempt suicide; drink enough alcohol to be legally drunk; or gamble. Homeschoolers were also significantly less likely to describe themselves as too busy, stressed out, angry with life, confused, or always tired. Conventionally schooled youth were significantly more likely to describe themselves as upbeat, encouraged, and seeking answers.

 

T. Wayne McEntire, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 2, 2005, p. 13-18

 

 

Unexplored Territory: Writing Instruction in Pennsylvania Homeschool Settings, Grades 9-12, Part II1

/

Unexplored Territory: Writing Instruction in Pennsylvania Homeschool Settings, Grades 9-12, Part II

Mapping aspects of one of homeschooling’s virgin areas—writing instruction—is the objective of this study. Primary data originate in semi-structured parent and secondary student interviews shaped by elements qualitative models and a phenomenological model. Concludes that learning write in home-based and parent-directed ways is a consequential instructional activity and that families in this study model significantly different outcomes.

 

Elaine Huber, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 1, 2004, p. 1-13

 

 

Social Development in Traditionally Schooled and Home Educated Children: A Case for Increased . . .

/

"Examines the factors that may contribute to the social development of children especially in regards to peer influence and parental involvement and monitoring. These effects are examined by looking at their influence across traditionally schooled and home schooled populations.

 

Michael S. Brady, Volume 15, No. 4, 2003, p. 11-18

 

 

Unexplored Territory: Writing Instruction in Pennsylvania Homeschool Settings, Grades 9-12, Part I

/
"Explores the educational perspectives, teaching approaches, family roles, and relationshipsas well as the writing experiences and composing processesthat energize a selected range of homeschool approaches to high school level writing.
Elaine Huber, Ph.D., Volume 15, No. 4, 2003, p. 1-10

 

 

Reading Aloud in Two Home Schools: A Qualitative Study

/
"Focuses on the act of reading aloud in two home schools. Finds, among other things, students who are in supportive home school environments receive the maximum benefit of being read aloud to by their parents.

Deanna Peterschick Gilmore, Ph.D. , Volume 15, No. 3, 2003, p. 11-20

 

Justice, Inequality, and Home Schooling

/
"Presents what is at issue in the debate about homeschooling and privatization. Philosophical analysis trace the logic that leads people from factual claims to conclusions about how we ought to live and how children ought to be educated.

 

Charles L. Howell, Ph.D., Volume 15, No. 3, 2003, p. 1-9