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A Brief Review of “Study: Homeschool Students Sleep Better"

PERSPECTIVES – News and Comments1 A Brief Review of “Study:…

Homeschooled Children’s Social Skills

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The social skills scores of the homeschooled were consistently higher than those of public school students. “Differences were most marked for girls and for older children, and encompassed all four of the specific skills tested: cooperation, assertiveness, empathy, and self-control.” Gender differences were considered and found.

Richard G. Medlin, Ph.D., 2006, Volume 17, Number 1, p. 1-8

Religious Outcomes in Conventionally Schooled and Home Schooled Youth

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Purposes to determine if outcomes of home educated students were commensurate with the religious objectives given by many as reason for choosing home-based education by comparing responses to the instrument entitled Daily Challenges Inventory. Significant difference between homeschooled and conventionally schooled youth was found on 14 items of the DCI. The homeschooled group was significantly less likely to watch MTV; use drugs; lie to a parent, teacher, or other older person; attempt suicide; drink enough alcohol to be legally drunk; or gamble. Homeschoolers were also significantly less likely to describe themselves as too busy, stressed out, angry with life, confused, or always tired. Conventionally schooled youth were significantly more likely to describe themselves as upbeat, encouraged, and seeking answers.

 

T. Wayne McEntire, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 2, 2005, p. 13-18

 

 

Unexplored Territory: Writing Instruction in Pennsylvania Homeschool Settings, Grades 9-12, Part II1

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Unexplored Territory: Writing Instruction in Pennsylvania Homeschool Settings, Grades 9-12, Part II

Mapping aspects of one of homeschooling’s virgin areas—writing instruction—is the objective of this study. Primary data originate in semi-structured parent and secondary student interviews shaped by elements qualitative models and a phenomenological model. Concludes that learning write in home-based and parent-directed ways is a consequential instructional activity and that families in this study model significantly different outcomes.

 

Elaine Huber, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 1, 2004, p. 1-13