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Homeschooled Students’ Adjustment to College

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Emotional, social and academic adjustment to college: A comparison between Christian home schooled and traditionally schooled college freshmen

Scott White, Elizabeth Williford, John Brower, Terance Collins, Roman Merry, and Maryam Washington; Home School Researcher, 2007, Volume 17, Number 4, p. 1-7.

Home schooled students’ ability to successfully adjust to college life is one important criterion to demonstrate a positive outcome of home schooling. The present study compared . . . on the College Adjustment Scale. The mean scores of the two groups were compared across the nine CAS scales designed to measure emotional, behavioral, social and academic problems typically presenting to university counseling centers. The home schooled students scored significantly . . .

Keywords, descriptors, key terms: college, college adjustment, adults, socialization, academics, home schooling, homeschooling, home education, home-based education

An Analysis of the Economic Impact of Home and Private Schooling in Nevada

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ARE HOME AND private schools a “cost” to traditional public schools? This argument has often been used by local school districts, and others, to push for legislation that would restrict the establishment of these alternative schools. By focusing on home and private schools, and using Nevada as an example, this paper analyzes the impact of these alternative schools in depth. What is found is that aside from their superior effectiveness (Duvall, Delquadri, & Ward, 2004; National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2002; Rudner, 1999), the reduced public school enrollment caused by the presence of alternative schooling results in lower educational costs for the affected school district.

John T. Wenders, Ph.D. & Andrea D. Clements, Ph.D., Volume 17, No. 2, 2007, p. 13-35

Homeschooling as “Educational Neglect” or Neglected Research Standards?

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Reviews Kelly, Barr, and Weatherby’s 2006 report entitled Educational Neglect & Compulsory Schooling: A Status Report in which they claimed that school-age children who are privately home educated and not registered with state agencies – even if the law does not require such registration – are “missing” and “educationally neglected.”  Explains significant philosphical and methodological weaknesses and errors in the report.

Brian D. Ray, Ph.D., Volume 17, Number 1, p. 9-12

Empathy, Altruism, and Moral Development

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Empathy, Altruism, and Moral Development in Home Schooled Children

 

Homschooling parents were more concerned with teaching their children their values and religious beliefs, and more convinced that their children’s education reinforced this endeavor, than public school parents. They were also more confident that their children had embraced the values encompassed in their education. The two groups of parents did not differ, however, concerning whether they wanted their children to decide for themselves what values to believe in. Compared to public school parents, home schooling parents reported slightly more prosocial behavior in their children.  In general, the attitudes toward religion and values expressed by home schooling parents were positively related to children’s prosocial behavior.

 Skylar T.  Kingston and Richard G. Medlin, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 4, 2006, p. 1-10

The Liberal State Thesis

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The Liberal State Thesis Regarding Parental Authority, Children’s Rights, and Homeschooling: How Far 

Critiques the “liberal state thesis” that, among other things, promotes “the continued development and encroachment of the liberal state upon parental authority to homeschool children without undue interference and regulation of the government.” Offers a more positive view of homeschooling, and defends the responsibility of parental authority in determining their children’s educational delivery system.

Stephen M. King, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 3, 2005, p. 15-24

 

Parental Duty and the Shape of the Future

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Explains that the state-based approach to determining which values are passed on to succeeding generations resolves the difficulty of indiscriminate social reproduction (i.e., some values are reproduced and not others) but it is not self-evident that this is the right way to resolve the difficulty. Explores an alternative approach, “a dispersed model in which individuals and groups work independently to preserve what they most value in the society and to pass beliefs and moral commitments on to the next generation.” Argues that this approach “better fits the actual moral beliefs of parents and citizens; it is more likely to produce the outcomes parents want (or should want) for their own children and what adult citizens should want for all children.”

 

Charles Howell, Ph.D., Volume 16, No. 3, 2005, p. 1-14

 

 

Social Development in Traditionally Schooled and Home Educated Children: A Case for Increased . . .

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"Examines the factors that may contribute to the social development of children especially in regards to peer influence and parental involvement and monitoring. These effects are examined by looking at their influence across traditionally schooled and home schooled populations.

 

Michael S. Brady, Volume 15, No. 4, 2003, p. 11-18

 

 

Unexplored Territory: Writing Instruction in Pennsylvania Homeschool Settings, Grades 9-12, Part I

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"Explores the educational perspectives, teaching approaches, family roles, and relationshipsas well as the writing experiences and composing processesthat energize a selected range of homeschool approaches to high school level writing.
Elaine Huber, Ph.D., Volume 15, No. 4, 2003, p. 1-10

 

 

Reading Aloud in Two Home Schools: A Qualitative Study

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"Focuses on the act of reading aloud in two home schools. Finds, among other things, students who are in supportive home school environments receive the maximum benefit of being read aloud to by their parents.

Deanna Peterschick Gilmore, Ph.D. , Volume 15, No. 3, 2003, p. 11-20

 

Justice, Inequality, and Home Schooling

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"Presents what is at issue in the debate about homeschooling and privatization. Philosophical analysis trace the logic that leads people from factual claims to conclusions about how we ought to live and how children ought to be educated.

 

Charles L. Howell, Ph.D., Volume 15, No. 3, 2003, p. 1-9